The Best TV Shows on Netflix to Watch Right Now (September 2021)

There are a million (don’t fact-check me) shows available to watch on Netflix, and it can be hard to know what’s actually worth your time. How many times have you caught yourself five episodes into something you aren’t really enjoying at all? We’ve all been there, so this list exists to help us just as much as it exists to help you. We’re keeping it updated with the best series to watch on Netflix right now, and in our latest update we’re recommending the British teen comedy Sex Education, which recently premiered its third season, the supernatural procedural Lucifer, which just wrapped up its very devilish six-season run, and the beginning of the final season of the international crime hit Money Heist. No, shows like Stranger Things and The Crown aren’t here right now, but they’ll be added into the mix once we get closer to new seasons. Still to come this month are Season 4 of Dear White People and the premiere of Midnight Mass, the latest horror series from the creator of The Haunting of Hill House.

A note about how this list was made: In the interest of keeping it relevant, we’re emphasizing new releases, shows recently added to Netflix, and Netflix originals, but we’ve also made sure to add the shows we personally can’t stop recommending to our friends. We’ll be updating it regularly.

Looking for the 50 best movies and TV shows to watch on Netflix or the best movies to watch on Netflix? Or more recommendations of what to watch next? We have a ton of them! We also have hand-picked selections based on shows you already love.

Last updated September 17; newer additions are at the top

Sex Education


For fans of: Kids discovering themselves, Gillian Anderson
Number of seasons: 3

Asa Butterfield and Emma Mackey, Sex Education

Netflix

There are so many coming-of-age television series out there, but few are as brazenly honest and endearing as this oneThe comedy, now in its third season, is a raunchy-on-the-outside and sweet-on-the-inside charmer about a teen boy who inadvertently becomes his school’s go-to sex therapist. The series explores teen sexuality in a refreshingly non-judgemental, authentic way, and it posits that whether you’re the most popular kid in school or the outcast eating lunch alone, there’s a universal and terrifying confusion in growing up that can be made more manageable by a supportive community and communication. Plus, Gillian Anderson co-stars as Otis’ eccentric divorcée mom, who is an actual sex therapist and has a house full of phallic statues, which is just a lot of fun. [Trailer]

Lucifer


For fans of: The devil, hell puns
Number of seasons: 6

Tom Ellis, Lucifer

Tom Ellis, Lucifer

Netflix

Procedural fans know that anyone can become an unlikely police consultant, including, in this case, the literal devil. Lucifer Morningstar (Tom Ellis), who’s abandoned hell to become a nightclub owner in Los Angeles, partners up with L.A.P.D. detective Chloe Decker (Lauren German) to solve crime — stranger things have happened, maybe? — while sorting out his otherworldly daddy issues. On top of being a fun show with a steamy will they/won’t they couple, Lucifer is also a clever spin on redemption stories. –Kelly Connolly [Trailer]

Money Heist


For fans of: Snappy shows that were meant for bingeing, twisty action, finding out who lives and who dies

Jaime Lorente, Belen Cuesta, and Ursula Corbero, Money Heist

Jaime Lorente, Belen Cuesta, and Ursula Corbero, Money Heist

Tamara Arranz/Netflix

Netflix recently announced that 97 percent of its American subscribers have watched an international (non-English language) series on its service, and I’m willing to bet 97 percent of those people were watching Money Heist, Álex Pina’s Spanish bank heist series. Pina’s preference for style and mystery over everything else is all over Money Heist, making it highly bingeable and perfect for the Netflix formula. Action! Drama! Skin! More action! This is the first half of the final part; the last episodes launch in December. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Post Mortem: No One Dies in Skarnes


For fans of: Santa Clarita Diet, loud food eating, Norwegian dark humor and dark drama

Post Mortem: No One Dies in Skarnes

Post Mortem: No One Dies in Skarnes

Netflix

This Norwegian series couldn’t decide if it wanted to be a comedy or a drama, so it chose to be both, and it does a damn fine job at it. It follows a woman not-so-curiously named Live (Kathrine Thorburg Johansen) who is murdered in a field but wakes up during her autopsy wondering what all the fuss is. In her second shot at life, she develops unusual traits, some good, like enhanced hearing, and some bad, like a, uhhhh, thirst for blood. Yeah, it’s a bit like Santa Clarita Diet, but not about zombies and without the corniness. Busy people rejoice: Season 1 is only six episodes long. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

The Chair


For fans of: Sandra Oh, the pains of academia
Number of seasons: 1

Sandra Oh and Jay Duplass, The Chair

Sandra Oh and Jay Duplass, The Chair

Eliza Morse / Netflix

Sandra Oh is starring in another TV show, which means everything is once again right with the world. Oh plays Dr. Ji-Yoon Kim, the newest (and first woman) Chair of the embattled English department at a swanky university. She navigates both professional and personal struggles, and crushes on a professor played by Jay Duplass, which is very relatable.

Bridgerton


For fans of: Romance, string covers of pop songs
Number of seasons: 1 (renewed for Season 2, date TBD)

Regé-Jean Page and Phoebe Dynevor, Bridgerton

Regé-Jean Page and Phoebe Dynevor, Bridgerton

Liam Daniel/Netflix

The first fruit of Shonda Rhimes’ massive Netflix development deal follows Daphne Bridgerton (Phoebe Dynevor) through her first season out in 1800s London society and her rollercoaster journey of falling in love with a reluctant duke (Rege-Jean Page), and it introduces us to the rest of the Bridgerton siblings and their immediate social circle as the elusive Lady Whistledown mysteriously catalogs all of the their gossip for her anonymous column. It’s Pride and Prejudice meets Gossip Girl and Scandal in the most delicious way possible. Heads up: Though the art for the series may make it look like a demure relaxing binge, Shonda and company stay true to the spirit of the source material, and things get very steamy as you get further into the season. –Megan Vick [Trailer]

Manifest


For fans of: Doomed flights, twists and turns, Lost
Number of seasons: 2 (Season 3 has yet to be added to Netflix)

Josh Dallas, Manifest

Josh Dallas, Manifest

NBC

You may have heard that people were extremely upset when NBC canceled Manifest after three seasons. The supernatural drama has a strong hold on a very vocal group of fans, and it’s pretty easy to see why people love it so much. The Lost-ian series centers on the passengers of a flight that was presumed missing for five years. When the plane finally lands, the people aboard have to reintegrate into a society they no longer recognize, with some of them even beginning to discover that there’s a much deeper mystery going on that they have to work to uncover. [Trailer]

Good Girls


For fans of: Moms with an edge, crime
Number of seasons: 3 (the fourth and final season is not on Netflix yet)

Mae Whitman, Christina Hendricks, and Retta, Good Girls

Mae Whitman, Christina Hendricks, and Retta, Good Girls

NBC

Christina Hendricks, Mae Whitman, and Retta star as three working-class suburban moms exhausted by the never-ending struggle to make ends meet who decide to take control of their lives by robbing a local grocery store. They pull it off, but that’s not the end of the story. It’s the aftermath of the crime that Good Girls is interested in, and the different ways the women react to it, such as Beth’s (Hendricks) realization that life as a criminal is preferable to life as a mother struggling to pay the bills. (Her relationship with Manny Montana’s gang leader Rio will scratch that will they-won’t they itch for you, too.) Good Girls is the kind of show that gets more fun to watch as the characters get in more trouble, so buckle up. [Trailer]

Evil


For fans of: Supernatural weirdness
Number of seasons: Season 1 available on Netflix

Mike Colter, Aasif Mandvi, and Katja Herbers, Evil

Mike Colter, Aasif Mandvi, and Katja Herbers, Evil

Elizabeth Fisher/CBS

No procedural on TV right now is having more fun than Evil is. The drama starts with a nice opposites-attract partnership: Psychologist Kristen Bouchard (Katja Herbers) teams up with priest-in-training David Acosta (Mike Colter) and tech expert Ben Shakir (Aasif Mandvi) to investigate claims of demonic possession on behalf of the Catholic Church. But because it hails from CBS’ favorite boundary pushers, Robert and Michelle King, it’s also fantastically dark and full of surprises. It’s philosophical, absurd, oh-so-smart, and a total must-watch. Plus, Kristen’s four daughters are the best kids on TV. (Note: Although only Season 1 is available on Netflix, you can watch Season 2 on Paramount+.) –Kelly Connolly [Trailer]

Never Have I Ever


For fans of: Teen romance, Mindy Kaling, the omniscient voice of John McEnroe
Number of seasons: 2 (renewed for Season 3, date TBD)

Maitreyi Ramakrishnan, Never Have I Ever

Maitreyi Ramakrishnan, Never Have I Ever

Isabella B. Vosmikova/Netflix

Mindy Kaling’s warm, wickedly funny spin on a classic high school comedy stars newcomer Maitreyi Ramakrishnan as Devi Vishwakumar, a high achiever desperate to reinvent herself after the sudden death of her father (Sendhil Ramamurthy, joining the ranks of TV’s hot dads even in flashbacks). As she navigates a love triangle and denies the depth of her grief, short-tempered Devi’s inner life is narrated, hilariously, by tennis legend John McEnroe. Never Have I Ever is Kaling’s best show yet, a charming Indian-American coming-of-age story that’s both personal and absurd. Who knew we all needed to hear John McEnroe say “thirst trap”? –Kelly Connolly [Trailer]

Lupin


For fans of: Committing crimes with style, heists
Number of seasons: 1 (divided into two parts, with a third on the way)

Antoine Gouy and Omar Sy, Lupin

Antoine Gouy and Omar Sy, Lupin

Netflix

Omar Sy stars as Assane Diop, a man who is essentially a French Bruce Wayne if Batman was more of a cat burglar than dark knight. Inspired by the classic French character Arsène Lupin, known as the “gentleman burglar,” Diop starts the series off trying to steal a valuable necklace from the Louvre with a grand heist as part of a revenge plot against the wealthy family responsible for the death of his father several years prior. Sy is a charming dude, and the heists and trickery are fun, complicated acts, performed under the guise of being the good guy. It may not be the greatest show Netflix ever put out, but it is a very entertaining distraction that’s easy to get through. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Naomi Osaka


For fans of: The true lives of professional athletes, mental health awareness
Number of seasons: 1

Naomi Osaka: Netflix limited series

Naomi Osaka

Netflix

Professional tennis player Naomi Osaka, like most athletes who have achieved the highest levels of their sport, projects an air of confidence. Filmed partly by Osaka, an advocate for mental health who has withdrawn from major events to raise support for the way athletes are treated by the media, the docuseries shows that those thrust into fame aren’t always ready for it. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Virgin River


For fans of: Hallmarkian romance, heartwarming tearjerkers
Number of seasons: 3

Alexandra Breckenridge and Martin Henderson, Virgin River

Alexandra Breckenridge and Martin Henderson, Virgin River

Netflix

Do you like it your TV to feel like one long Hallmark movie? If that’s the case, you should know that few other shows are currently doing that better than Virgin River. In this adaptation of the novels by Robyn Carr, Alexandra Breckenridge stars as Mel, a nurse practitioner from Los Angeles who, after having her heart broken one too many times, starts a new life in a remote Northern California town. As these things go, she quickly meets Jack (Martin Henderson), a bartender who makes her want to love again. This show really has everything: long lost twin brothers, bombshell pregnancies, and main characters getting shot by mysterious gunmen. [Trailer]

Grace and Frankie


For fans of: Classic sitcom feels, female friendships, odd couples
Number of seasons: 7

Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin, Grace and Frankie

Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin, Grace and Frankie

Melissa Moseley/Netflix

One of Netflix’s longest-running original series (and soon to be its longest-running American series once its final season concludes), Grace and Frankie follows the two titular women, played by Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin, as they embark on new lives when their husbands come out as gay and partner up together. There’s an Odd Couple vibe as Grace (Fonda) is a no-nonsense cosmetics mogul and Frankie (Tomlin) is a hippie artist, which only cements their friendship beyond the sitcom-setup bond. Netflix surprise released the first four episodes of the final season as a treat for fans, with the remaining 12 coming in 2022. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Sweet Tooth


For fans of: Animal-human politics, the end of the world
Number of seasons: 1 (renewed for Season 2)

Christian Convery, Sweet Tooth

Christian Convery, Sweet Tooth

Kirsty Griffin/Netflix

Set in the aftermath of a catastrophic global virus, the comic book adaptation Sweet Tooth is a show for our times. The series follows a “very special boy” named Gus (Christian Convery), a human-deer hybrid on a journey across the American West, accompanied by an unexpected group of friends. It’s just the right blend of strange, dark, and hopeful, with a resonance no one involved in the show originally could have planned. -Kelly Connolly [Trailer]

Atypical


For fans of: Laughing and crying (sometimes at the same time), penguins
Number of seasons: 4

Keir Gilchrist, Brigette Lundy-Paine, Atypical

Keir Gilchrist, Brigette Lundy-Paine, Atypical

Netflix

Atypical is not your typical coming-of-age story. The family drama focuses on Sam (a wonderful Keir Gilchrist), a young man on the autism spectrum dealing with the drama of high school and college, and his family and friends, who are perpetually supporting him through the challenges of growing up even as his unique viewpoint and understanding of the world occasionally frustrate them. It’s incredibly heartwarming as we watch Sam become a more independent person, but it gives Sam’s friends and family equally enjoyable storylines. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

The Circle


For fans of: People being stuck in one place, lying on social media
Number of seasons: 2 (renewed for Season 3, date TBD)

Chloe Veitch, The Circle

Chloe Veitch, The Circle

Netflix

Social media is a cesspool of lies and insecurities, and this Netflix original pounces on that idea and takes it to the next level. Contestants all live in a single apartment complex but never come face-to-face with each other, communicating only through a proprietary social media platform that connects them all. As they build their profiles and chat with each other they must decide how they want to be portrayed in order to avoid getting voted out, Big Brother-style. But that means some go all out with catfishing and pretend to be people they aren’t, while others feel authenticity is the best. It turns out that no one can ever really be sure that the person they’re getting friendly with is who they say they are. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Elite


For fans of: Melodrama, melodrama, melodrama
Number of seasons: 4

Elite

Elite

Manuel Fernandez-Valdes

Elite, the Spanish-language series about three working-class friends who enroll in a luxe private school, is the ideal mix of unhinged camp and actual high-stakes drama. The show centers around the inevitable culture clash between the new kids and their exorbitantly wealthy classmates, but there’s also a murder mystery woven throughout the plot. A lot of teen shows these take themselves incredibly seriously, and while Elite deals with its share of socially relevant topics like homophobia and religion, it leans hard into its chaotic roots, and that makes it all the more watchable. [Trailer]

High on the Hog: How African American Culture Transformed America


For fans of: Getting a history lesson while your stomach growls
Number of seasons: 1 (four hour-long episodes)

Stephen Satterfield and Dr. Jessica B. Harris, High on the Hog: How African American Culture Transformed America

Stephen Satterfield and Dr. Jessica B. Harris, High on the Hog: How African American Culture Transformed America

Netflix

Netflix has a large catalog of food shows, but none quite like High on the Hog. Hosted by Stephen Satterfield, the four-part docuseries is about Satterfield’s journey to learn about the storied history of African American cuisine. He learns about the contributions Black people have made to food, and how much of an influence food from the past has on the food we eat now, including the origins of okra, dishes created by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington’s enslaved chefs, and how mac and cheese came to be. The show is infectiously joyful, and has a lovely “discover your roots” spirit. Fair warning, though: You’re going to be starving after each episode. [Trailer]

Beastars


For fans of: Addictive but uncomfortable anthropomorphic sexualized drama, philosophical discussions of one’s true nature
Number of seasons: 2

Beastars

Beastars

Netflix

Even in a genre that is well known for pushing the limits of sanity, the anime Beastars is pretty damned weird. Set at a high school for anthropomorphized animals, Beastars follows a wolf whose predatory nature surfaces when he falls for an adorable young rabbit. But Beastars is adept at capturing the confusing feelings of puberty and the complicated dynamics of the teen social scene by mixing them with murder, instinct, and sexual desire through the eyes of animals. Does he want to eat the rabbit or just make out with her? Sometimes the line isn’t as clear as you’d think in this YA (young animal) whodunnit. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Black Summer


For fans of: Intense no-cut actions sequences, life and death situations
Number of seasons: 2

Christine Lee, Jaime King, and Justin Chu Gary, Black Summer

Christine Lee, Jaime King, and Justin Chu Gary, Black Summer

Netflix

Not all zombie shows are built the same, and this spiritual spin-off of the goofy Z Nation focuses on the gritty life-or-death situation of a small group of people trying to survive a zombie apocalypse. It’s intentionally minimal on plot (and at times dialogue), letting the action — frequently told in long takes with no cuts and some athletic cameramen — tell the story. For my money, it’s the best zombie show on TV. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Breaking Bad


For fans of: Great TV, great acting, great cinematography, great writing, great everything
Number of seasons: 5

Bryan Cranston and Giancarlo Esposito, Breaking Bad

Bryan Cranston and Giancarlo Esposito, Breaking Bad

Ursula Coyote/AMC

Well, it’s perhaps the greatest television show ever made, so yeah, you should watch it. Bryan Cranston stars as antihero Walter White, a mild-mannered high school chemistry teacher who begins cooking meth to pay for his cancer treatments and finds that he really, really likes it. It won 16 Primetime Emmy Awards, including two for Best Drama Series in 2013 and 2014. Some will say the first season is only OK, but those people are morons. While you’re at it, watch the spin-off, Better Call Saul, which is also on Netflix. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Alone


For fans of: Survivor, but scarier
Number of seasons: Season 7 available on Netflix

Alone

Alone

Brendan George Ko

History’s survival competition Alone is unlike pretty much anything else on TV. The show invites tough people from all around the globe to be dropped in the middle of the wilderness with one rule: don’t die! They’re armed with limited resources and a camera to document their experience, and whoever succeeds the longest without getting choppered out of the woods wins half a million dollars. It’s a pretty brutal watch, but thrilling and impressive if you’re curious just how much humans are able to survive if they’re resourceful. And even better to know you literally will never have to do this yourself! (Note: Only Season 7 is available on Netflix, but History has made a total of eight seasons of this baby so far.) [Trailer]

Criminal Minds


For fans of: Procedurals, the twisted brains of serial killers
Number of seasons: 12 

Criminal Minds

Criminal Minds

Cliff Lipson/CBS

This CBS series follows an elite squad of criminal profilers — or “mind hunters” — working for the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit as they investigate crimes and track down perpetrators using their combined expertise to identify a predator’s motivations and emotional triggers, and anticipate their next move before they can strike again. Complex cases, unique characters, and Shemar Moore saying “baby girl” make this series a must-watch. –Keisha Hatchett [Trailer]

Downton Abbey


For fans of: Period pieces full of twists and turns, Dame Maggie Smith
Number of seasons: 6 

Michelle Dockery and Laura Carmichael, Downton Abbey

Michelle Dockery and Laura Carmichael, Downton Abbey

Julian Fellowes’ sprawling ensemble drama gives all the elaborate costumes, lush production design, and wealthy English people with attitudes you could ask for. Beginning around the time of Titanic sinking in 1912 (that’s relevant to the story, I promise), Downton Abbey centers around the lives of the aristocratic Crawley family and the people who work for them. You might be tempted to compare it to The Crown, but Downton leans much more into soapiness. Let me tell you, there are some weird plot lines on this show — I’m talking main characters being suspected for murder, fake cousins, and that time Mary (Michelle Dockery) accidentally killed a guy after having sex with him, among other things. But it all works because everyone’s just so earnest about it! Also, never forget that Downton is the show that gave us Maggie Smith asking, “What is a weekend?” [Trailer]

Ginny & Georgia


For fans of: Mother-daughter dynamics with a side of intrigue
Number of seasons: 1 (renewed for Season 2, date TBD)

Antonia Gentry and Brianne Howey, Ginny & Georgia

Antonia Gentry and Brianne Howey, Ginny & Georgia

Netflix

“We’re like the Gilmore girls but with bigger boobs,” Georgia (Brianne Howey) says in the first episode of this high-energy series, and that about sums it up. The mother-daughter dramedy follows Georgia as she hauls her 15-year-old daughter Ginny (Antonia Gentry) and 9-year-old son Austin from Texas to a small town in Massachusetts for two reasons: to start over after Georgia’s husband suddenly dies, and to run away from a closet full of skeletons. It’s part teen drama as Ginny explores a new high school and part mystery thriller as Georgia’s dangerous secrets come to chase her down. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Ozark


For fans of: The color blue, Jason Bateman
Number of seasons: 3 (renewed for Season 4, date TBD)

Jason Bateman and Laura Linney, Ozark

Jason Bateman and Laura Linney, Ozark

STEVE DIETL/NETFLIX

This hit thriller stars Jason Bateman and Laura Linney as Marty and Wendy Byrde, a married couple who move their family from Chicago to the Lake of the Ozarks region of Missouri after Marty’s job laundering drug cartel money goes south. Because this is a drama series, that obviously isn’t the end of it, and the Byrdes become involved with local criminals. The show is kind of ridiculous, but it’s elevated by great direction and great performances, particularly from Julia Garner (who has won two Emmys for her work on the show) as Ruth, a member of a local crime family who ends up forming an interesting relationship with Marty. [Trailer]

Shadow and Bone


For fans of: Game of Thrones by way of Freeform
Number of seasons: 1 (renewed for a second season, date TBD)

Ben Barnes and Jessie Mei Li, Shadow and Bone

Ben Barnes and Jessie Mei Li, Shadow and Bone

Netflix

Based on Leigh Bardugo’s dueling Grishaverse novel series, Shadow and Bone and Six of Crows, the big-budget series follows a young woman who discovers she’s in possession of a power that can save the kingdom, natch. The tone is somewhere between Game of Thrones and something you’d find on Freeform, with a dark color scheme and violence mixing it up with love triangles. Fair warning: the world-building of the first two episodes can get a little tedious, but it gets better after that. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Pose


For fans of: Unbridled joy, queer history
Number of seasons: 3

Pose (FX)

Billy Porter, Pose

FX

How wrong we were to believe we’d seen a full, three-dimensional representation of the LGBTQ community on TV before Pose arrived in 2018. The FX series, set decades ago in the New York City ballroom community, has served to show us how much we don’t know and haven’t seen. In this heartwarming and often hilarious drama, the trans women who started the ballroom scene — the scene that’s made black/Latinx gay lingo like “slay,” “read,” and “spill the tea” mainstream — get their due, making them the subject of the story instead of the afterthoughts. Through characters Blanca (Mj Rodriguez), Elektra (Dominique Jackson), Angel (Indya Moore), and Pray Tell (Billy Porter), we befriend queer people of color who’ve banded together for survival, for love, and the pursuit of happiness. It’s radical for humanizing trans people and portraying their unique experiences with compassion, but it shouldn’t be: It’s fundamentally an engrossing, uplifting show stuffed with drama and heart. Consider it essential viewing. –Malcolm Venable [Trailer]

I Think You Should Leave with Tim Robinson


For fans of: Chaos, having good car ideas, wet steaks, weak coffins, fart toilets, complex patterns on shirts
Number of seasons: 2

Tim Robinson, I Think You Should Leave

Tim Robinson, I Think You Should Leave

Netflix

Sometimes what you want is to see your id, your most base animal instincts, the unhinged thoughts you definitely have but rarely voice, reflected on screen. You may or may not remember Tim Robinson from his time on Saturday Night Live; honestly, they didn’t really know what to do with him over there, and in retrospect it’s clear that what he needed was something of his own where he could really let his freak flag fly. That’s I Think You Should Leave in a nutshell! It’s a madcap rollercoaster of a sketch series that features Robinson playing a host of weirdo characters with big personalities and strong convictions about things that don’t really matter, such as his highly memeable hot dog mascot who refuses to admit he was the one who crashed his car into a storefront. Like anything that’s really, truly hilarious, it’s sort of impossible to describe. You just have to watch it to understand. [Trailer]

Happy Endings


For fans of: Lovable weirdos, pop culture references up the wazoo
Number of seasons: 3

Happy Endings

Happy Endings

Bob D’Amico/ABC

Happy Endings is one of those shows with a small but mighty fanbase who love to say things like, “I wish they’d bring it back,” and “I can’t believe no one watched it when it was on” whenever it’s brought up. Those people are all correct! The world just wasn’t ready for the truly oddball jokes Happy Endings excelled at, even though its premise — a small group of friends hang out all the time and get into hijinks — pretty much seemed like a recipe for sitcom success. The cast’s chemistry is just so good, the jokes come lightning fast, and there are also some legitimately heartwarming episodes, like the one where the group helps Max (Adam Pally) come out to his parents. It’s definitely worth a watch if ensemble comedies are your thing. [Trailer]

Kim’s Convenience


For fans of: Feel-good family sitcoms
Number of seasons: 5

Paul Sun-Hyung Lee, Kim's Convenience

Paul Sun-Hyung Lee, Kim’s Convenience

Netflix

Following a Korean-Canadian family who own and operate a convenience store, Kim’s Convenience is a true screwball comedy that is as great as it is not only because of its takes on immigrant family life but also thanks to the bonds between its characters. The show understands how complicated parent-children relationships can be, even (or especially) when you love each other, which is what makes Appa (Paul Sun-Hyung Lee), the traditional and stubborn patriarch, slowly begin to mend his relationship with his estranged son Jung (Simu Liu), or Janet (Andrea Bang) trying to pave her own way as a young, independent woman without upsetting her mother (Jean Yung) so lovely to watch. It’s the kind of show that feels like a hug. [Trailer]

Last Chance U&Last Chance U: Basketball


For fans of: Inspiring sports stories
Number of seasons: 5 seasons of Last Chance U and 1 season of Last Chance U: Basketball

Last Chance U

Last Chance U

Netflix

One of TV’s best sports docuseries, every season of Last Chance U follows a different junior college football program across the U.S. It focuses on the students — many of whom are highly touted as players, but deal with challenges on and off the field — as they attempt to keep up their performance both on the team and in the classroom in order to remain eligible. The show gives unique access to the host of issues student athletes face, and goes deep into the ambition many of the players have to move into Division 1 football programs. Its spinoff, Last Chance U: Basketball, is just as good, with its first season spotlighting the East Los Angeles College Huskies as they try to turn their fortunes around with a roster made up of kids who failed to live up to expectations at higher division programs because of various factors. The sport is different, but the emotional impact remains the same as their coach pushes them to be the best players and people they can be. [Trailer]

Master of None


For fans of: When comedians enter their serious auteur era
Number of seasons: 3

Lena Waithe and Naomi Ackie, Master of None

Lena Waithe and Naomi Ackie, Master of None

Netflix

When Master of None first premiered in 2015, the series became a reset for co-creator and star Aziz Ansari’s career, who up until that point had mostly been known for his role as the guy on Parks and Recreation who gave us “treat yo’ self.” Ansari played Dev, a New York actor struggling with the personal and the professional, and the show was pretty universally acclaimed, especially in its triumphant second season, which brought black-and-white cinematography, references to French New Wave, and a beautiful, Golden Globe-winning episode about Dev’s friend Denise’s (Lena Waithe) coming out. It was in between Season 2 and its surprise Season 3 that sexual misconduct allegations against Ansari were made public, and when the show eventually did return after a long hiatus, it shifted the focus from Dev to Denise, exploring her relationship with her wife Alicia (Naomi Ackie). The good news is that it stayed fascinating throughout, wrestling with the characters’ flaws and exploring regret and loss in an entirely human way. [Trailer]

30 Rock


For fans of: The comedy stylings of Tina Fey, werewolf bar mitzvahs
Number of seasons: 7

Tina Fey and Alec Baldwin, 30 Rock

Tina Fey and Alec Baldwin, 30 Rock

Ali Goldstein/Getty Images

What can be said about 30 Rock, Tina Fey’s classic sitcom inspired by her time at Saturday Night Live, that hasn’t already been said? Set behind-the-scenes at a fictional NBC sketch show called TGS, the series revolves around perpetually overworked Liz Lemon (Fey), her network executive boss Jack (Alec Baldwin), her eccentric stars, Jenna (Jane Krakowski) and Tracy (Tracy Morgan), and the cast of bizarre characters they work with. Apart from being one of the funniest shows ever made, which it is, 30 Rock is also in the unique position of still being relevant years after it aired its series finale, largely in part to how many cultural oddities it somehow managed to joke about before they actual happened. It is, as they say, the blueprint. [Trailer]

Murder Among the Mormons


For fans of: True crime, feeling unsettled
Number of seasons: 1 (three hour-long episodes)

Murder Among the Mormons

Murder Among the Mormons

Netflix

Your next true crime obsession is this three-part series detailing murders that shook the Mormon community in Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1985. Following a pair of pipe bombs that killed two people, a third victim was found with a trunk full of rare documents that include the notorious White Salamander Letter, which had the potential to destroy the very foundation of Mormonism. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Outlander


For fans of: Sex, time travel, history
Number of seasons: 4

Caitriona Balfe and Sam Heughan, Outlander

Caitriona Balfe and Sam Heughan, Outlander

Starz

Depending on who you ask, Outlander is either the sexiest show on TV, or it’s a historical drama with a touch of sci-fi. Or maybe it’s both! Based on the book series by Diana Gabaldon, Outlander revolves around Claire (Caitriona Balfe), a married World War II nurse who, during a trip with her husband (Tobias Menzies), mysteriously time travels back to 1743. Thrown into the past and desperate to get home, Claire finds herself embroiled in a Scottish uprising while slowly but surely falling in love with a young warrior named Jamie Fraser (Sam Heughan). If you’re looking for something that will give you an occasionally accurate history lesson and get you invested in a sweeping romance that spans centuries, Outlander is the show for you. [Trailer]

Ragnarok


For fans of: Norse mythology, ecology
Number of seasons: 2

David Stakston, Ragnarok

David Stakston, Ragnarok

Netflix

Ragnarok is a Norwegian series with an environmentalist message buried inside a story that pulls from Norse mythology. The show follows Magne (David Stakston), who is the second coming of Thor, as he fights against the Jutul Corporation, which is run by other figures from Norse mythology who look like posh and impossibly beautiful humans. They are the embodiment of corporate malfeasance and, as Norway’s fifth-wealthiest family, representative of the one percent. But their factories are also polluting the beautiful and picturesque town of Edda, Norway, and Thor just ain’t about that. Ragnarok might not be the greatest show ever made, but it’s only twelve episodes and a breeze to watch. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

This Is a Robbery: The World’s Biggest Art Heist


For fans of: Boston accents, true crime that’s actually fun
Number of seasons: 1 (four hour-long episodes)

Myles Connor, This Is a Robbery: The World's Biggest Art Heist

Myles Connor, This Is a Robbery: The World’s Biggest Art Heist

Netflix

In 1990, two men posing as police officers robbed Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum of $500 million in art. Over 30 years later, none of that work has been recovered, and the case remains unsolved. That infamous art theft is the subject of this gripping four-part true crime docuseries, which digs into the mystery of who took those paintings and where they are now. The series also promises some juicy mafia drama, because it’s Boston. -Kelly Connolly [Trailer]

Tuca & Bertie


For fans of: Girls being friends, talking animals
Number of seasons: 1

Tuca & Bertie

Tuca & Bertie

Netflix

If you can believe it, one of the best shows about the intricacies of adult female friendship is a cartoon about two anthropomorphic birds. Tiffany Haddish and Ali Wong voice Tuca and Bertie, respectively, two besties navigating their 30s together. Tuca is the energetic, immature one, while Bertie is anxious, career-focused, and trying to make things work with her boyfriend, Speckle (Steven Yeun). Their relationship feels wholly realized, in all of its issues and borderline codependency, and is anchored by the immense love they have for each other. The series is made special by creator Lisa Hanawalt’s signature style of animation (which you can also see on display in BoJack Horseman!), turning Tuca and Bertie’s world into a zany, vibrant landscape where it’s not uncommon to befriend a crop top-wearing plant or ride a subway car that’s actually a caterpillar, but it also touches on serious topics like sexual assault and addiction with sensitivity. This is a show to be watched with your closest pal. (Note: Netflix canceled Tuca & Bertie after one season, but the good news is that Cartoon Network picked it up for Season 2.) [Trailer]

Who Killed Sara?


For fans of: Seeking vengeance
Number of seasons: 2

Andres Baida, Ximena Lamadrid, Leo Deluglio, and Polo Morin, Who Killed Sara?

Andres Baida, Ximena Lamadrid, Leo Deluglio, and Polo Morin, Who Killed Sara?

Netflix

This Spanish-language drama was an unexpected hit after it premiered on Netflix, and for good reason. The series follows Alex (Manolo Cardona), a former convict who is framed for the murder of his sister, Sara. Alex sets out to exact revenge against whoever framed him, and the mystery comes in as he tries to find the culprit. The best way to describe this show is “soap opera with a slightly bigger budget,” which is not a dig at all. It makes for a compelling, and relatively fast, watch, and anyway, who among us doesn’t love a little melodrama? [Trailer]

Workin’ Moms


For fans of: Cult sitcoms, giving moms their due
Number of seasons: 5

Dani Kind and Catherine Reitman, Workin' Moms

Dani Kind and Catherine Reitman, Workin’ Moms

Netflix

If you’re looking for a comedy that’s still flying under the radar, check out Workin’ Moms, a sleeper hit that has quietly built up a following as each season hits Netflix. The series follows mom-friends Kate (creator Catherine Reitman), Anne (Dani Kind), Frankie (Juno Rinaldi), and the rest of the parents in their Mommy and Me group. Workin’ Moms is a brutally honest take on motherhood that doesn’t shy away from its characters’ unlikable sides. –Kelly Connolly [Trailer]

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